Energycount - Dorset - SAP Calculations - SBEM Calculations - Part L - EPC - Renewables Reports - Energy Statements
Energycount - Dorset - SAP Calculations - SBEM Calculations - Part L - EPC - Renewables Reports - Energy Statements
Energycount - Dorset - SAP Calculations - SBEM Calculations - Part L - EPC - Renewables Reports - Energy Statements
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Air Tightness Testing

Air Tightness Testing shows how airtight a building is. The more airtight a building is the less heat energy can escape. A building’s SAP calculations will normally assume a certain level of air tightness in order to achieve a ‘pass’.

Air Tightness Testing - fan test

An air test is conducted by temporarily installing a large fan into an external doorway of a dwelling and either blowing air into, or sucking air out of the building. The fan is set to a series of different fan speeds to show how much air can enter or escape the building, thus showing how airtight the building is. The result (q50) is measured in m³/hour/m² surface area, (or n50 for Passivhaus, ACH – Air Changes per Hour).

The maximum q50 allowed in a SAP calculation is 10.0, although a result of 5.0 or less is typically achieved.

 

Making your Building Airtight

Before we carry out an Air Test we would recommend that you check the following: 

  • Under floor ventilator grilles 
  • Gaps in and around suspended timber floors 
  • Leaky windows and door  
  • Gaps around windows 
  • Gaps at the ceiling-to-wall joint at the eaves 
  • Open chimney 
  • Gaps around loft hatches 
  • Service penetrations through ceiling  
  • Vents penetrating the ceiling/roof 
  • Bathroom wall vent or extraction fan 
  • Gaps around bathroom waste pipes 
  • Kitchen wall vent or extractor fan 
  • Gaps around kitchen waste pipes 
  • Gaps around floor-to-wall joints (particularly with timber frames) 
  • Gaps around electrical fittings in hollow walls 
  • All boxing sealed 
  • Backs of toilets (particularly wall-hung WCs) 

Also, it is worth noting the guidance re: temporary sealing: 

Can be sealed: 

  • Fireplaces/woodburners 
  • Extractor fans and passive wall/ceiling vents 
  • Trickle vents (2013 regs onwards)

 

*Air Tightness Testing is sometimes referred to as Air Permeability Testing or Air Pressure Testing.

 


 

 

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